Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.760994
Title: Illness perceptions in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome and other physical health conditions : application of the common sense model
Author: Haines, Cara
ISNI:       0000 0004 7432 6599
Awarding Body: University of Bath
Current Institution: University of Bath
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Background: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in adolescents is associated with severe functional impairment. CFS is distinct from other physical health conditions in that individuals can experience high levels of uncertainty, stigma and disbelief from others. Illness perceptions in CFS are therefore of particular interest and have implications for treatment. However, research on illness perceptions in adolescents is limited. This study compared illness perceptions in adolescents with CFS with other physical health conditions. Method: Adolescents (aged 11–18) with CFS (n = 49), type 1 diabetes (n = 52) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (n = 42) were recruited through NHS clinics and online and completed a series of questionnaires. Results: Adolescents with CFS differed on the perceived consequences, timeline, personal control, treatment control, identity and understanding dimensions of illness perceptions. Except identity, these dimensions were predicted by health condition even when accounting for age, gender, fatigue, physical functioning, anxiety and depression. Conclusions: Results offer preliminary evidence for the applicability of the CSM in adolescents, with implications for supporting adolescents with physical health conditions. Results suggest that psychological interventions targeting perceived control, understanding and identity may have particular utility for adolescents with CFS.
Supervisor: Loades, Maria Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.760994  DOI: Not available
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