Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.760413
Title: David Foster Wallace's hideous neoliberal spermatics
Author: Jackson, Edward William
ISNI:       0000 0004 7432 4032
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2018
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Thesis embargoed until 01 Sep 2023
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This thesis investigates male sexuality and neoliberalism in the work of David Foster Wallace. I argue that his texts conceive of male sexuality through neoliberal logics regarding responsibility, risk, contract, property, and austerity. Informing such conceptions are spermatic metaphors of investment, waste, blockage, and release. These dynamics allow Wallace’s texts to ground masculinity in an apparently incontestable sexual hideousness, characterised in particular by negativity and violence. By figuring male sexuality as a neutral economic issue, and one that lends itself to spermatic metaphors, his fiction and nonfiction present such hideousness as a fact to be accommodated for rather than changed. My analysis is broadly revisionist. I depart from readings that stress his texts’ opposition to neoliberalism by showing how they are embedded in, and complicit in reproducing, its key logics. I also nuance considerations of Wallace’s gender politics by arguing that their sexual traditionalism is indicative of an attachment to male hideousness, not their author’s intentions or failings. In these ways my thesis evaluates the complex pessimism animating Wallace’s treatment of male sexuality. I trace the interaction between neoliberal logics and spermatic metaphors throughout his oeuvre to consider how and why Wallace presents male sexuality as being so immutably rotten.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Midlands3Cities
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.760413  DOI: Not available
Keywords: PN Literature (General) ; PN0080 Criticism ; PS American literature
Share: