Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.760384
Title: Family caregivers of people with an acquired brain injury : attributions of challenging behaviour and psychological interventions for emotional wellbeing
Author: Major, Grace
ISNI:       0000 0004 7432 3742
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Objective: To use Weiner's attributional model of helping behaviour to investigate the relationship between causal attributions of challenging behaviour, emotional response and propensity to help in family caregivers of people with acquired brain injury. Method: Twenty four male and female caregivers, aged 29-73 years, were recruited through Headway, a charitable organisation. Participants completed an online questionnaire, giving information on the type of challenging behaviour they had witnessed in the previous month. They rated their attributions, emotions (anger and sympathy) and propensity to help in relation to this behaviour. Correlational and mediation analyses were utilised to examine relationships between key variables. Results: No significant correlations were found between attributions, emotions and propensity to help, with the exception of anger and sympathy and helping. Emotions did not mediate the relationship between attributions and propensity to help. Conclusion: Whilst Weiner's model (I 980; 1985) may be applicable to other populations, there was little evidence for its application in family caregivers of people with ABI. Attributions may not be the most important determinant of willingness to help in family caregivers. Methodological issues are explored and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.760384  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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