Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.760365
Title: 'To perform, or not to perform: that is the question' : a survey of how secondary school headteachers perceive their enactment status in leadership
Author: Ford, Elizabeth Kathryn Rose
ISNI:       0000 0004 7432 3558
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
In recent years there has been a significant increase in interest around career development in Educational Leadership. Through my own personal drive and leadership qualities, I began to question the idea of performance for successful leadership. Following observations of a particular leader I was even more intrigued about how one ought to perform as a leader and whether it is a conscious act dependent upon the message being delivered and the audience in which it is being enacted to. As I began to explore this concept further it became apparent that there was little research existing on how leaders perform and learn to perform. This study is set out to investigate the perception of headteachers’ from the West Midlands who are in practice to demonstrate the concept of performance ‘as’ and performance ‘is’ leadership. Semi-structured interviews were used between July 2012 and January 2013 to secure their perceptions of their own relatable understanding of performance in leaderships, including their professional development to equip them with such enactment skills, and the emotional cost that this has on their professional identity. This study captures ways in which you need to perform as a leader to be successful in delivering your messages to your followers. However, during such acts of performance there is a need to stay true to ones self and honest to the performance, resulting in an emotional cost to ensure that a professional identity is maintained. Leaders learn most of their skills through experiences, which takes time and opportunities to fine tune. This raises the questions that in todays’ current school led system do we have the experience to role model and develop such skills? This piece of research is set out to inform the future research agenda for professional development of school leaders developing strategies and opportunities for leaders to grow.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ed.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.760365  DOI: Not available
Keywords: LB Theory and practice of education ; LB2300 Higher Education
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