Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.759545
Title: The experience of white British fathers providing care to a son or daughter with a diagnosis of psychosis : an exploration of fathers' accounts of coping
Author: Richardson, Suzanna J.
ISNI:       0000 0004 7431 5793
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Aim: Given the move towards community-based care and potential changes in attitudes towards men and caring, it was the aim of this study to explore the experiences of fathers caring for and coping with having a son or daughter with psychosis and begin to identify ‘how’ they cope or ‘what helps’ them to cope in this challenging role. Methods: A qualitative exploratory design was employed using semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Participants were six white British fathers who self-identified as providing care to their son/daughter who had experienced a first-episode of psychosis, and were under the care of an early intervention team. All fathers were of working age, with a mean age of 56 years and the identified child was living with them at the time of interview. Results: Results suggest that gender identity and masculinity play some role in these fathers’ understanding of their caring role. Strategies that helped them to cope were identified and themes around men and talking emerged as prominent in interviews. Conclusions: With the literature lacking in focused research around coping in relation to parents caring for children with psychosis, and even less focused on fathers, the current research adds valuable research into this important population. Themes suggest that providing opportunities for fathers to talk about their emotions and encouragement to make use of strategies they find effective will enable these fathers to continue providing care to their son or daughter. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.
Supervisor: Moulton-Perkins, Alesia ; Gleeson, Kate Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.759545  DOI: Not available
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