Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.759388
Title: The Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner experience : an interpretative phenomenological analysis
Author: Parkinson, Abbie
ISNI:       0000 0004 7431 4264
Awarding Body: Staffordshire University
Current Institution: Staffordshire University
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This thesis evaluates the current literature on staff experiences within Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. It extends on current knowledge and directly explores the experiences of Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners (PWPs). Chapter one is a literature review, appraising what it is known about the experiences of clinical staff in IAPT services. Burnout and stress were found to be significant experiences of this population. Potential differences between IAPT professionals were also indicated. Limited qualitative research has been conducted in this area. It was recommended that further exploratory research is completed with independent staff groups, particularly PWPs. Chapter two is an empirical paper designed to answer two research questions: How do PWPs experience their role? What meaning do PWPs give to these experiences? Nine participants were recruited to complete semi-structured interviews. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was employed, which indicated four superordinate themes: The Business Model, Process of Internalisation, Emotional and Clinical Impact, and Supportive Structures. The clinical implications and areas for service development are discussed with recommendations for future research. Chapter three is an executive summary of the research paper. This aims to improve the accessibility and usability of the research. The paper is aimed at professionals, as they are the focus of this thesis.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.759388  DOI: Not available
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