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Title: Affinities between Venda and other southern Bantu languages
Author: Jones-Phillipson, Rosalie
Awarding Body: SOAS University of London
Current Institution: SOAS, University of London
Date of Award: 1972
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Abstract:
The thesis consists, as is indicated in the title, of a study of certain languages of southern Africa, in order to discover their affinities in respect to Venda, The study begins with a consideration of the relevant parts of Comparative Bantu to these languages. Prom this a hypothetical 'family tree' is constructed against which conclusions from that material based on other considerations may be seen. The study is divided broadly into three main sections; firstly, the consideration of material that is wholly consistent with Common Bantu, secondly that which is only partially consistent and finally that which does not correspond to Common Bantu at all. Initially, the criteria used to establish the direct cognates between the languages are dealt with. Subsequently, a survey is undertaken of other putative cognates which appear not to conform to the stipulations laid down for direct cognates. Finally, computations are carried out to determine the ratio of direct as opposed to indirect cognates in each language in order to throw more light on their affinities with Venda. In every case the comparisons are made using Venda as the focal point in relation to the six other selected neighbouring languages. It has been found that Venda, while having distinct affinities with Sotho in some respects and Shona in others, should continue to be classified in a separate group. Various hypotheses have been formulated on the basis of the affinities postulated between Venda and the other selected languages. These are in certain respects an extension in detail of some of the more general hypotheses put forward in Comparative Bantu.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.758807  DOI:
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