Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.758299
Title: How nostalgia and narcissism affect consumption of popular cultural artefacts
Author: Bhandal, Rajinder Kaur
ISNI:       0000 0004 7431 0730
Awarding Body: University of Leeds
Current Institution: University of Leeds
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This research investigates the contingent effect of age and self-concepts on narcissism in shaping nostalgic preferences. The results show that narcissism impacts on consumers’ nostalgic preferences, while age significantly moderates these relationships. Furthermore, when public self is activated under admiration, the results show that younger people choose nostalgic preferences in contrast to older people, who choose non-nostalgic preferences. However, when the public self is activated under rivalry, the opposite occurs, such that younger people choose non-nostalgic preferences compared to older people, who choose nostalgic preferences. The findings of this research have theoretical as well as managerial implications. Firstly, this is the first study to examine the relationship between nostalgia and the dimensions of narcissism, admiration vs. rivalry, in relation to the consumption of cultural artefacts. Secondly, the theoretical relationship between self-concepts, relating to the public self and the private self, has not been applied to the two dimensions of narcissism (admiration vs. rivalry). Thirdly, the moderating role of age relating to admiration vs. rivalry has not been examined in relation to nostalgic preferences. Finally, this research extends existing research examining the consumption of nostalgic preferences, which is incidentally limited and under-researched. In practice managers can draw on the findings on this research to better understand the factors at play in shaping nostalgic consumptions. This knowledge can be leveraged in designing more effective marketing campaigns.
Supervisor: Brakus, Joško Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.758299  DOI: Not available
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