Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.756440
Title: Popular cultural production and political action : a study of the use of video by the Indian population of Brazil
Author: De Paula, Silas J.
Awarding Body: Loughborough University
Current Institution: Loughborough University
Date of Award: 1996
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Abstract:
The main objective of this thesis is to analyse the use of video and its social function among the Indian tribes in Brazil, and to understand the significance of the videos for non-Indian audiences. To achieve this understanding it was necessary, first, to look at the specific set of practices by means of which symbolic forms are created, circulated and appropriated inside the Indian villages. Second, it was necessary to work among non-Indian people, in different social classes, in order to understand what kind of meaning arises in the audience when they watch the videos. This work begins with a review of previous research about cultural identity, in order to locate theoretically my own study. This is followed by a discussion of the importance of popular cultural mediation for identity formation. It is argued that cultural identity is always manufactured and constructed by social process. As new technologies of communication play a key role in this process, this thesis also contextualizes 'alternative' media work, especially video work done by popular groups in Brazil and other countries. It is argued here, that video is a useful tool in the struggle for survival, ethnically and physically. In this sense, this thesis works with the hypothesis that the Indians show a positive self-presentation throughout the videos that helps to gain support from the new social movements in Brazil. Through audience research, this work explores questions of documentary form as a political tool, i.e. in which way these documentaries affect the viewers perception of the Brazilian Indians' cultural identity and claims.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: CNPQ, Brazil
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.756440  DOI: Not available
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