Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.755290
Title: Stalking and mental health : a thesis exploring the risks facing clients and clinicians
Author: Tostevin, Amy
ISNI:       0000 0004 7428 2880
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Mental health professionals are at greater risk of being stalked by their clients compared to other professionals. However, there is still much that we do not know about stalking of this nature and little attention is given to the victim perspective of this type of stalking. More questions need to ask why this population may be at greater risk of being victimized and how we can help those who are. This thesis attempted to ask such questions in two ways; 1) by exploring the context of mental health settings and what factors may mediate the stalking of mental health professionals by psychiatric patients and 2) by taking a 'victim-specific' stance on research, presenting ideas about victim-related risk factors, raising awareness of the consequences of stalking victimization for these individuals and highlighting where organisations and research may be limited in their ability to help prevent such a serious yet under-recognised crime. Main findings suggest that psychiatric patients perceive stalking to be more or less serious depending on the stalker-victim relationship, there are characteristics significantly associated with stalking victimization of professionals (for example, gender of professional, motivation of stalking and mental illness of stalker), stalking has a significant psychological impact on mental health professionals who are victimized and current research suffers disparity regarding various factors (for example, definition of stalking and evidence used for risk assessments). Implications of these findings are addressed throughout.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.755290  DOI: Not available
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