Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.754415
Title: "I deserved better than that" : survivors' decision-making around legal disclosure of historic childhood sexual abuse : an interpretative phenomenological analysis and clinical research portfolio
Author: Plastock, Hope
ISNI:       0000 0004 7427 4522
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Background: Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a prevalent crime which often leads to lifelong consequences for survivors, although has low rates of prosecution. Research on CSA disclosure in general suggests survivors may decide not to engage with the criminal justice process through ‘legal disclosure’ for various interpersonal, intrapersonal and systemic reasons. However, little research exists regarding legal disclosure. To support CSA survivors to access justice, it is necessary to understand the factors which influence their decisions around engaging with the legal system. Objective: To qualitatively explore the lived experience of decision-making around engagement with the legal system for adult survivors of CSA. Specifically, their perceptions of barriers and facilitators to engagement. Participants and Settings Clinicians in 3 NHS Scotland Psychological Trauma Services identified clients meeting study criteria. 7 participants took part in individual semi-structured interviews. Results: Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used. Two main themes were developed during analysis: 1) awareness of and preparedness for what the legal system involves and 2) weighing up the value of disclosure. Barriers and facilitators to engagement are discussed. Conclusions: This study found that, similarly to informal disclosure, various barriers and facilitators exist to legal disclosure. Legal disclosure may require a distinct foundation of supportive factors due to the formal investigative process which can follow. The findings can assist clinicians, police and legal professionals working with CSA survivors to promote support and engagement around legal disclosure.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.754415  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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