Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.754154
Title: A discourse analysis of recovery stories
Author: Madders, S.
ISNI:       0000 0004 7427 2121
Awarding Body: University of Essex
Current Institution: University of Essex
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Following a rise in people 'speaking out' about their recovery and thus challenging traditional psychiatric ideas of chronicity, the recovery approach has become a central guiding vision within mental health services. This thesis comprises two parts. The first part applies a genealogical method to conduct a genealogical analysis of the recovery approach through exploration of UK policy within the last decade. This explores the conditions of possibility for its emergence in UK policy and mental health services and its growth. In the second part, a Foucauldian discourse analysis is used to analyse stories of recovery. Recovery stories are collected from organisational websites in the third sector and public sector. Subject positioning and power/knowledge implications are discussed in light of eleven discursive constructions: personal interpretation, person al responsibility, socioeconomic opportunity, self - management, an ongoing process, expertise and sharing stories, professional embodiment, fulfilment through work, living well without work, acceptance of illness and acceptance by others. These 'personal' testimonies might reflect wider discourses in the mental health system. The research shows the powerful interests at play under the discourse of recovery, and the promotion of particular 'truths' that this brings with it. Counter to this are smaller sites of resistance. Implications are discussed for clinical practice and further research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.754154  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RA790 Mental Health
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