Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.753107
Title: Investigation of tissue microenvironments using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging
Author: Meeus, Emma Maria
ISNI:       0000 0004 7426 2142
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) has rapidly become an important part of cancer patient management. In this thesis, challenges in the analysis and interpretation ofDW-MRI data are investigated with focus on the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model, and its applications to childhood cancers. Using guidelines for validation of potential imaging biomarkers, technical and biological investigation of IVIM was undertaken using a combination of model simulations and in vivo data. To reduce the translational gap between the research and clinical use of IVIM, the model was implemented into an in-house built clinical decision support system. Technical validation was performed with assessment of accuracy, precision and bias of the estimated IVIM parameters. Best performance was achieved with a constrained IVIM fitting approach. The optimal use of b-values was dependent on the tissue characteristics and a compromise between bias and variability. Reliable data analysis was strongly dependent on the data quality and particularly the signal-to-noise ratio. IVIM perfusion fraction (j) was generally found to correlate with dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging derived cerebral blood volume. IVIM-f also presented as a potential diagnostic biomarker in discriminating between malignant retroperitoneal tumour types. Overall, the results encourage the use of IVIM parameters as potential imaging biomarkers.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) ; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) ; Birmingham Children's Hospital Research Foundation ; 'Help Harry Help Others'
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.753107  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QD Chemistry
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