Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.753045
Title: Precarity and identity in the ivory tower : exploring the effects of performative pressures in UK and French business schools
Author: Gribling Marinova, Maria
ISNI:       0000 0004 7426 1529
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Recent marketization trends in Higher Education trigger concerns about growing precarity of the academic profession. Global pressures from reputational mechanisms such as international rankings and accreditations underpin the risk of institutional isomorphism and a possible convergence of academic career paths. This thesis draws from a comparative empirical study of academic careers in UK and French Business Schools and focuses on two areas of inquiry. The first study demonstrates how context-bound career scripts, their validation mechanisms, and the margins they allow for individual agency variously shape permeable and impermeable career boundaries and mechanisms for precarity, and condition the agentic behaviour of academics. I argue that the particular ways in which performance incentives and punishments are balanced in each country under supranational competitive pressures produce different results in terms of segregation and casualization of academics. The second study explores identity responses of female faculty to performative pressures in the two countries and the strategies they adopt to reconcile compliance with managerialist requirements and their own need for recognition and meaningful work in what is traditionally seen as a gendered professional environment. My contributions deepen the understanding of contextual responses to international challenges and highlight the implications for academics and institutions.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.753045  DOI: Not available
Keywords: HD Industries. Land use. Labor ; HD28 Management. Industrial Management ; HF Commerce
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