Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.752329
Title: A framework for the neuroscientific study of collective efficacy : measurement and manipulation
Author: Bruton, Adam Mark
ISNI:       0000 0004 7425 4724
Awarding Body: Swansea University
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Collective efficacy research to date has yet to consider the neural mechanisms associated with its formation. Specifically, no measurement tools have been developed for use with brain imaging study designs. In addition, there has been limited consideration of how collective efficacy can be manipulated in such circumstances. The aim of this thesis was to provide a framework (measurement and manipulation) for the neuroscientific study of individual collective efficacy perceptions. In chapter two, three separate study designs (cross-sectional, laboratory, field) were used to examine the psychometric properties of an operational stem designed for use with single-item collective measurement in sports teams. Study one assessed the ability of two theoretically linked inventories and previous performance results to predict single-item stem scores. Incorporated in a single-item measure suitable for use in neuroscientific study the stem had robust concurrent, convergent, and predictive validity with competitive sports teams in a cross-sectional design. In the second study, a single-item measure specific to the laboratory-based task correlated strongly with an existing collective efficacy instrument. In addition, scores at pre- and post-intervention showed no change in collective efficacy. Combined, these findings indicate concurrent validity and test-retest reliability for the stem in a laboratory-based context. In the third study, an identical single-item measure to study one correlated strongly with an existing collective efficacy instrument. Furthermore, strong correlations were reported between scores at pre- and post-intervention for individuals predicted to show no change in collective efficacy. Together, these results indicate concurrent validity and test-retest reliability for the stem in a field-based context. Chapter three of the thesis considered intervention strategies appropriate for the manipulation of collective efficacy. Observation was proposed to have a strong theoretical/conceptual link with collective efficacy. Chapter four subsequently comprised two studies examining the use of observation interventions to manipulate individual collective efficacy perceptions. Study one examined the effect of observation content (positive/neutral/negative) upon collective efficacy using a laboratory-based design. Collective efficacy increased for positive and neutral intervention conditions and decreased for the negative condition. Study two examined the effect of familiarity of observation content (familiar vs. unfamiliar) upon collective efficacy using a field-based design. Collective efficacy increased for both familiar and unfamiliar conditions when viewing a positive observation intervention, with the largest increase for the familiar condition. The overall findings of this thesis have increased understanding of single-item measurement of collective efficacy and its manipulation using observation interventions. Practical recommendations are suggested for how the single-item stem can measure the effects of observation interventions upon collective efficacy across different settings in sport. Finally, it is recommended that the single-item stem and observation interventions developed in this thesis be used to measure and increase collective efficacy within a neuroscientific study design to investigate the neural correlates of collective efficacy perceptions.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.752329  DOI: Not available
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