Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.751953
Title: Factors that moderate the relationship between occupational stressors and health
Author: Button, Lori A.
Awarding Body: University of Wales, Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2004
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This study examined the factors that moderate the relationship between occupational stressors and health. Previous research has suggested that coping strategies and social support structures can alleviate the negative effect of occupational stress on health, Furthermore, despite the important advances made concerning social support, there is limited research examining the various aspects of support (i.e. source, nature, need and provision). This research examined the effect of proposed stress buffers, in particular the various aspects of social support, on the relationship between occupational stressors and health. Five hundred and thirty participants from three South Wales (UK) organisations were appraised in this study: 166 production-line workers, 290 health service employees and 74 governmental agency employees. A questionnaire was distributed within the organisations. It assessed the participants' coping strategies, social support, occupational stressors, job strain, psychological health and physical health measures. In contrast to prior stress research, coping strategies did not moderate the relationship between occupational stressors and health. However, the various aspects of social support were found to be both detrimental and beneficial to the relationship between occupational stressors and health levels. Specifically, co-worker support outside of work was the most influential and advantageous source of support. Additional questions arose as to the effect of proposed stress buffers on life stress, compared to job stress, and health. Overall, it was concluded that social support does buffer the relationship between occupational stressors and health, although the relationship is complex.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.751953  DOI: Not available
Share: