Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.749594
Title: Forgetting the unforgivable : amnesties following the Algerian War of Independence (1962-2012)
Author: Fathi, Laila
ISNI:       0000 0004 7234 0629
Awarding Body: SOAS University of London
Current Institution: SOAS, University of London
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This thesis investigates the amnesty process in France between 1962 and 2012, following the Algerian War of Independence. The research focuses on two questions. First, what was the role of the amnesties in the context of the Algerian war? Second how do amnesties affect the prospect of post-transitional justice? This thesis contends that the impact of amnesty legislations is both integral and reactive to political dynamics of post-conflict transformation. Through the use of historical archives as well as semi-structured interviews, this thesis reaches the following conclusions. Firstly it suggests that understanding the role of amnesty laws during political transformations requires looking beyond traditional approaches of accountability in post-conflict settings. Second, the symbolical dimensions of the French amnesty and their evolution over time emphasises the interactive dynamics between transitional justice mechanisms and aspirations of political transformation. In the case of France, these interactions are enters in competition with ideas and representations of the past held by social and political actors. This thesis investigates the amnesty process in France between 1962 and 2012, following the Algerian War of Independence. The research focuses on two questions. First, what was the role of the amnesties in the context of the Algerian war? Second how do amnesties affect the prospect of post-transitional justice? This thesis contends that the impact of amnesty legislations is both integral and reactive to political dynamics of post-conflict transformation. Through the use of historical archives as well as semi-structured interviews, this thesis reaches the following conclusions. Firstly it suggests that understanding the role of amnesty laws during political transformations requires looking beyond traditional approaches of accountability in post-conflict settings. Second, the symbolical dimensions of the French amnesty and their evolution over time emphasises the interactive dynamics between transitional justice mechanisms and aspirations of political transformation. In the case of France, these interactions are enters in competition with ideas and representations of the past held by social and political actors.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.749594  DOI:
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