Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.748926
Title: Development of cation-directed acylation reactions
Author: Rahemtulla, Benjamin F.
ISNI:       0000 0004 7232 766X
Awarding Body: University of Oxford
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This thesis describes work conducted towards the enantioselective acylation of ketones using phase-transfer catalysis. Chapter 1 introduces the field of ketone acylation, with a focus on catalytic methods accompanied by the generation of axes, planes or points of chirality during these transformations. Chapters 2 describes the synthesis and evaluation of a variety of different frameworks for enantioselective ketone O-acylation; we highlight the selectivity and reactivity challenges faced when attempting this transformation (Scheme I). Chapter 3 focuses on the intramolecular O-acylation of enolates to generate axially chiral lactones. The development of these systems led to the discovery that the C/O-selectivity of this reaction was dependent on the steric hindrance about the axis of rotation, and C-acylation could be favoured under the correct conditions. Chapter 4 describes the conception and development of an enantioselective C-acylation reaction, culminating in the first reported catalytic enantioselective direct C-acylation of a ketone (Scheme II). The scope and limitations of this methodology were investigated and the products were successfully elaborated to afford a range of spirocyclic architectures. Finally, chapter 5 focuses on the kinetic analysis of the enantioselective C-acylation reaction in order to increase our understanding of the mechanisms behind phase-transfer catalysis and the mode of activation of the catalyst.
Supervisor: Smith, Martin D. ; Clark, Hugh F. Sponsor: GSK
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.748926  DOI: Not available
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