Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.748697
Title: Combatting social exclusion through public space design
Author: Emanuel, Gabrielle
ISNI:       0000 0004 7234 2157
Awarding Body: University of Oxford
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Changes in school architecture and design can improve educational outcomes (Sahlberg, 2011). Changes in hospital architecture and design can reduce patient violence in psychiatric wards (Ulrich et al., 2008). Can the design of public places help prevent social exclusion and promote social cohesion? This research compares public parks in the UK and the US. Near the turn of the 21st century, both countries had parallel political movements, similar design philosophies, and growing social polarisation. However, addressing social exclusion and cohesion were policy priorities in the UK, but not in the US. Textual analysis found that national political discourses influenced design recommendations for public parks in each country. Urban planners in the UK proposed design features aimed at preventing social exclusion. In eight case study parks, systematic observation suggests UK parks designed in this context attracted users more representative of the surrounding community than their correlate parks in the US. Where the design features were implemented, user interviews suggest they facilitated positive social interactions among park users. However, fieldwork revealed that implementation varied in both the UK and the US. Elite interviews underscore the role of park designers and urban planners as ‘street-level bureaucrats' who influence how social policies come to fruition. The findings also suggest urban design can be a powerful tool in tackling social policy agendas.
Supervisor: Walker, Robert Sponsor: Department of Social Policy and Intervention
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.748697  DOI: Not available
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