Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.748409
Title: Ibn Taymiyya's concept of jihad and its appropriation by the contemporary jihadists
Author: Maihula, Jabir
ISNI:       0000 0004 7233 7067
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Ahmad ibn Taymiyya (d.1328), is one of the most quoted medieval scholars by contemporary jihadists from the 1980s to the present time. Jihadists from ʿAbd Salām Faraj (d. 1981) to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) cite Ibn Taymiyya frequently in justifying their doctrines. These doctrines include excommunicating contemporary Muslim rulers and their allies and calling for jihad against them, classifying the Muslim countries as a domain of war and obligating emigration from them, suicide attacks in the name of jihad, and others. This thesis studies the relationship between Ibn Taymiyya’s concept of jihad and how it is appropriated by the contemporary jihadists. The thesis is divided into two parts. Part one studies selected works of Ibn Taymiyya on jihad to outline his concept of jihad while part two studies selected works of the contemporary jihadists to outline how Ibn Taymiyya’s concept of jihad is appropriated by them. The thesis argues that while some contemporary jihadi doctrines could be justified from Ibn Taymiyya’s concept of jihad, most of the doctrines cannot be justified from Ibn Taymiyya if his works on jihad are approached holistically. The thesis identifies the jihadi doctrines that can be justified from Ibn Taymiyya and those that cannot be. The thesis also identifies some sources that the jihadists use besides Ibn Taymiyya in justifying their doctrines.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.748409  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BP Islam. Bahaism. Theosophy, etc.
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