Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.748197
Title: Understanding Hellenistic Thanatos : death, ritual and identity in the south-eastern Aegean in the late 4th-1st c. BC
Author: Brouma, Vasiliki
ISNI:       0000 0004 7233 3306
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The aim of this thesis is to examine ritual action and identity formation in the funerary record of the South-Eastern Aegean during the Hellenistic period (late 4th – 1st centuries BC). Chapter 1 presents the aim, scope, originality, research context and methodology of the thesis. Chapter 2 provides the geographical background of the thesis along with the topographical features of the tombs and the cemeteries followed by a discussion on the deathscapes of the South-Eastern Aegean in Hellenistic times. Chapter 3 is a concise typological analysis of the tomb types in the islands and the mainland cities of the Rhodian peraea and Chapter 4 offers a contextual look into funerary and post-funerary ritual drawing from various types of evidence such as modes of disposal of the human body, monumental tomb architecture (tombs with funerary beds) and funerary monuments (cylindrical altars with decorations in relief) among others. In Chapter 5, I discuss several manifestations of individual and collective identity as inferred by the archaeological record, as far as this is possible, followed by a brief assessment of insularity and identity in the Hellenistic communities of the South-Eastern Aegean. Finally, chapter 6 offers a synopsised outline of the main themes explored in the thesis along with general and specific conclusions.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.748197  DOI: Not available
Keywords: CC Archaeology ; DF Greece
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