Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.747116
Title: Computational aspects of parvalbumin-positive interneuron function
Author: Cornford, Jonathan
ISNI:       0000 0004 7228 5308
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The activity of neurons is dependent on the manner in which they process synaptic inputs from other cells. In the event of clustered synaptic input, neurons can respond in a nonlinear manner through synaptic and dendritic mechanisms. Such mechanisms are well established in principal excitatory neurons throughout the brain, where they increase neuronal computational ability and information storage capacity. In contrast for parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, the most common cortical class of in- hibitory interneuron, synaptic integration is thought to be either linear or sub-linear in nature, facilitating their role as mediators of precise and fast inhibition. This thesis addresses situations in which PV+ interneurons integrate synaptic inputs in a nonlinear manner, and explores the functions of this synaptic processing. First, I describe a form of cooperative supralinear synaptic integration by local excitatory inputs onto PV+ interneurons, and I extend these results to show how this augments the computational capability of PV+ cells within spiking neuron networks. I also explore the importance of polyamine-modulation of synaptic receptors in mediating sublinear synaptic integration, and discuss how this expands the array of mechanisms known to perform similar functions in PV+ cells. Finally, I present work manipulating PV+ cells experimentally during epilepsy. I consider these findings together with recent scientific advances and suggest how they account for a number of open questions and previously contradictory theories of PV+ interneuron function.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.747116  DOI: Not available
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