Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.747082
Title: Understanding the facilitators and barriers to participation in people with acquired cognitive impairment
Author: Waite, Jacob
ISNI:       0000 0004 7228 3142
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model of disability holds that both personal and environmental factors predict participation. However, little is known about these predictors for people with dementia. Similarly, ‘partnership between patients and clinicians in research’ is a stated aim of UK government policy but little is known about what facilitates this in the dementia population, particularly with respect to peer research. This thesis sought to throw light on both areas. Part 1 comprises a systematic review of research about factors associated with social participation by adults with acquired cognitive impairment. Results showed that, in some studies, psychological factors (e.g. self-efficacy) social factors (e.g. caregiver functioning or social support), and societal factors (e.g. the built environment), and transport were associated with social participation. Part 2 comprises an interview-based, qualitative, empirical study of different perspectives regarding the facilitators and barriers to people with dementia (PWD) doing peer research. Findings highlighted multiple factors that facilitated or hindered this activity: assumptions and language, adapting activity to the needs and abilities of PWD, perceptions of danger and opportunities for building trust, and motivations. Part 3 comprises a critical appraisal of issues encountered in the course of carrying out this research. Topics discussed include: personhood versus citizenship, insider research, creating the topic guide and defining peer research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.747082  DOI: Not available
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