Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.747047
Title: From access to quality? : the enactment of school enrolment policy for internal migrant children in urban China
Author: Yu, Hui
ISNI:       0000 0004 7228 1059
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
In China, internal migrant children’s difficulties accessing schooling in metropolitan areas have been on the government’s policy agenda since 2001. By 2006, a range of policies were in place, designed to facilitate their access to compulsory education. Yet there are still large numbers of migrant children unable to enrol in state schools. While there are myriad studies devoted to the schooling of migrant children, less is known about how the policy framework surrounding their education is developed and enacted. My research aims to fill this gap. Taking a policy sociology approach, I have produced a scholarly analysis of the power relations between the different actors involved in policy enactment, drawing mainly on Bourdieusian, but also Foucauldian, resources. The overall research question is ‘How do different individuals, organisations and groups of actors interpret and enact the policy for migrant children’s schooling?’ I have examined what happens both outside and inside schools. I have used semi-structured interviews as the main method in order to produce rich, in- depth data. The findings of this research indicate that the migrant children's schooling policy carries with it the principle of equal access to education. Yet the degree to which that has been realized is questionable. I argue that, through processes of policy enactment, the unequal power relations between the migrant families, schools and the local government have been further reproduced, but in apparently legitimate ways. As a result, both migrant children and the schools that mainly recruit migrant children are marginalised in the urban education system.
Supervisor: Vincent, C. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.747047  DOI: Not available
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