Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.746957
Title: The characteristics of homeless adults with autistic traits
Author: Ryder, Morag
ISNI:       0000 0004 7227 545X
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This volume is divided into three sections. Part One is a systematic review of research into the relationship between social support and housing outcomes in the homeless population. The evidence largely suggests that homeless individuals have smaller social networks and reduced social support compared to housed individuals. Within the homeless population, reduced social support is associated with longer histories of homelessness and sleeping on the streets. There are mixed findings regarding the role of social support in achieving housing stability in homeless adults. The findings informed some of the topics explored in Part Two. Part Two presents empirical research into the characteristics of homeless adults with elevated autistic traits. Based on informant reports by keyworkers, pathways into homelessness and the course of homelessness were found to differ between homeless individuals with elevated autistic traits and the general homeless population. The findings suggest that there is a subset of the homeless population with specific characteristics. The clinical implications of these findings are to raise awareness of the characteristics and potential needs of this group and for homeless services to consider adapting their environments to become more autism-friendly. This was part of a joint study with Alasdair Churchard, also a trainee clinical psychologist also at University College London (UCL). Part Three presents a critical appraisal of the research process undertaken in Part Two. It reflects on some of the challenges in conducting research into this population and the limitations of the study design. It also details the steps taken to disseminate the research findings.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.746957  DOI: Not available
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