Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.746922
Title: Learning to self-soothe without food : emotion regulation, self-compassion and eating disorders
Author: Amey, Rebecca
ISNI:       0000 0004 7227 2427
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This thesis is comprised of three parts, with an overall focus on the role of emotion regulation in the maintenance of eating disorders. Part One is a systematic review of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) as a treatment for eating disorders. Twenty-one studies are reviewed with consideration of the methodological quality of the studies. The findings indicate that modified DBT is an efficacious treatment for adults with Binge Eating disorder (BED) and Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Research into mechanisms of action and predictors and moderators of outcome following DBT is in its infancy, and further research is necessary to establish how and for whom this treatment works. Part Two presents empirical research into the effects of self-compassion and self-criticism on cravings to eat, affect and food consumption, in women with BED and BN. The study found that self-compassion in comparison to self-criticism, after a negative mood induction, was associated with improved mood, a reduction in the rewarding hedonic value of food, reduced food cravings and reduced food consumption. Limitations to interpretation of results are discussed, along with potential clinical applications and suggestions for future research. Part Three provides a critical appraisal of the systematic review and empirical study. It includes a reflection of clinical observations and theoretical perspectives that informed the research questions, and a discussion of methodological considerations and dilemmas that arose through the research process. The appraisal concludes with a discussion of the findings within a broader context.
Supervisor: Serpell, L. ; Kamboj, S. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.746922  DOI: Not available
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