Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.746830
Title: Prospective memory and future event simulation in frequent cannabis users
Author: Braidwood, Ruth
ISNI:       0000 0004 7226 5446
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Background. Frequent cannabis users have been found to show impaired memory for past events, but it is not clear whether they are also impaired in prospective memory for future events. Aims. To objectively assess prospective memory (PM) in frequent cannabis users (one group dependent on cannabis, and one group non-dependent) compared to non-using controls, and to examine the effects of future event simulation (FES) on PM performance. To explore depression, anxiety and ‘schizotypy’ across groups. Design. An independent groups design. Setting. University College London. Participants. Fifty-four participants (18 dependent cannabis users, 18 non-dependent cannabis users and 18 controls) took part and were matched on age, gender, and highest level of education. Measures. The Virtual Week was used to assess PM abilities, with and without FES. Other measures: Cannabis Use Potency Questionnaire (CPU-Q), immediate and delayed prose recall, phonemic and category fluency, Spot-the-Word, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and a measure of schizotypy (O-LIFE: Unusual Experiences). Results. There were no group differences in PM performance on the Virtual Week, and FES did not improve PM performance. Dependent cannabis users scored higher on depression, anxiety and schizotypy than both other groups (non-dependent cannabis users and controls, who scored similarly). Conclusions. When carefully matched on baseline variables, cannabis users do not differ from non-using controls on PM. Suggestions for future research are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.746830  DOI: Not available
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