Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.746543
Title: Developing and piloting an ecologically valid measure of executive function for children with autism : a function-led approach
Author: Pullinger, J. M.
ISNI:       0000 0004 7224 4821
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The focus of this thesis is executive functioning in children and adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (this term is used synonymously with autism). Part one of the thesis is a systematic review of studies investigating generativity skills using fluency tasks. Specifically, it uses meta-analytic techniques to appraise whether a generativity deficit is evident across the lifespan in those with autism. It then considers variables that may moderate these effects, including participant characteristics and study quality. The empirical paper (part two) describes the development of a new measure of executive function for children with autism; the EcoTED (Ecologically valid Test of Executive Dysfunction). This measure consists of seven tasks developed using a function-led approach, with the aim of improving on the ecological validity of those measures currently available. The paper reports on the development of four tasks including initial piloting and analysis of their psychometric properties. The project was conducted jointly with another DClinPsy doctoral student who describes the three remaining tasks elsewhere (Bristow, 2016). The final part of this thesis is a critical reflection on the process of conducting the research. It discusses the origins of the study and the complexities of developing an ecologically valid measure that is psychometrically sound. It gives some suggestions relating to future directions of the Eco-TED and reflects on some of the complexities of research involving those with ASD.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.746543  DOI: Not available
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