Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.746275
Title: A 12-month follow-up study evaluating group interventions for children with Tourette Syndrome
Author: Dabrowski, J. M.
ISNI:       0000 0004 7230 840X
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This thesis consists of three parts: a systematic literature review, an empirical paper and a critical appraisal. It aims to contribute to the evidence base for psychological interventions for Tourette Syndrome (TS). TS is a neurodevelopmental condition characterised by the presence of both motor and vocal tics. Tics typically first present in childhood and are associated with psychiatric co-morbidity, social and emotional difficulties, impaired school functioning and a diminished quality of life. The literature review explores the efficacy and effectiveness of currently available psychological interventions for TS. It reviews both traditional behavioural approaches as well as newer adaptations of existing treatment protocols. The empirical paper evaluates the long-term outcomes of two group treatments (Comprehensive Behavioural Intervention for Tics and psychoeducation) for children with TS. It assesses the effect of these treatments on tic severity, neuropsychological functioning, quality of life and school attendance. Finally, the critical appraisal reflects on the process of conducting the research study. Specifically, it comments on the unique advantages and disadvantages of joining a larger research project, further explores the strengths and limitations of the study’s methodology and finally reflects on the experience of working with children with a neurodevelopmental disorder.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.746275  DOI: Not available
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