Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.745574
Title: Heterobimetallic ruthenium complexes containing ferrocene as anti-cancer agents
Author: Allison, Matthew Steven
ISNI:       0000 0004 7225 7155
Awarding Body: University of Leeds
Current Institution: University of Leeds
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This thesis details the synthesis and characterisation of ruthenium metal complexes containing functionalised ferrocene β-diketonate ligands. The anticancer and antimicrobial potential of these complexes has been explored and structural activity relationships investigated through further mechanistic investigations. A library of functionalised ferrocene β diketonate ligands were synthesised and used in the formation of two libraries of ruthenium complexes. The first series of complexes consist of organometallic ruthenium(II) arene complexes and the second series comprising of ruthenium(II) bis-bipyridyl coordination complexes. Detailed synthetic routes are outlined and all complexes are fully characterised by 1H NMR spectroscopy, 13C [1H] NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. X-ray crystallographic data was obtained when possible. The complexes were screened for their activity against one healthy and two cancerous cell lines; the ruthenium arene complexes were found to be highly selective towards the cancerous cell lines while the ruthenium bis-bipyridyl complexes were found to possess potent toxicity towards all cell lines. Selected complexes from each series were then studied in a low oxygen environment which caused a reduction in the cytotoxicity of the complexes. The antibacterial and antifungal properties of the two series of ruthenium complexes has also been assessed. Mechanistic studies have been conducted on selected complexes in the form of hydrolysis, hydrophobicity, biomembrane CV and comet assay in order to deduce a possible mechanism of action and mode of transport of these complexes.
Supervisor: McGowan, Patrick Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.745574  DOI: Not available
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