Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.742376
Title: The status and expanding role of joint development of common or transboundary oil and gas resources in international law
Author: Bojang, Buba
ISNI:       0000 0004 7228 6829
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2017
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Thesis embargoed until 11 May 2023
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
The growth and expansion of Joint Development Agreements, which promote the joint development of common or transboundary petroleum deposits between countries with opposite or adjacent coastlines are an indication that the status of the obligation to jointly develop common or transboundary oil and gas resources as a rule of customary international law may no longer be doubtful. This research examines the origin and evolution of Joint Development (JD) to determine its status in international law, including the law of the sea. It also explores the concept of shared natural resources in international law, intending to determine whether common or transboundary oil and gas resources are a part of the family of shared natural resources. It argues that the rule applicable to other shared natural resources such as international rivers, transboundary fish stocks and transboundary groundwater may be extrapolated and applied to common or transboundary oil and gas resources. It gives a detailed, analytical account of the progressive development of the concept of JD and how the International Law Commission (ILC) failed to take this developing trend to the level of codification when it decided in 2009 to discontinue the topic of oil and gas in its programme of work. The research argues that JD of common or transboundary oil and gas resources should now be considered as a settled norm of customary international law.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: University of Aberdeen
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.742376  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Natural resources ; Natural gas ; Petroleum law and legislation
Share: