Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.742033
Title: Veteran adjustment to civilian life
Author: Lovatt, Rebecca
ISNI:       0000 0004 7226 0848
Awarding Body: Staffordshire University & Keele University
Current Institution: Staffordshire University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The aim of this thesis is to explore the transition experiences of veterans when they leave the Armed Forces. Paper one consists of a literature review: a systematic search of relevant databases identified eight studies that are described and critically appraised. Thematic analysis produced four themes: 1) Mental health; 2) Length of Adjustment; 3) Barriers to transition and 4) Social Support. This review recommended that further research should explore qualitative methods with male and female British veterans. Paper two is a qualitative study exploring the experiences of medical discharge and the process of transitioning to civilian life in a sample of British veterans with PTSD. Purposive sampling was used to interview seven males receiving treatment at Combat Stress. Transcripts were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (Smith, Flowers, & Larkin, 2009) and four super-ordinate themes were identified: identity; disconnection; the will to live; and reaching out for help. Key findings are explored in relation to coping styles, shame and stigma, and Social Identity Theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979). Future research should consider how to support this subgroup of veterans, and more qualitative methodology is needed to explore the individual transitional experiences. Paper three provides a personal reflective commentary of completing the research; the process of selecting a research topic; feelings of surrendering control; working with veterans; therapist versus researcher conflicts; and the researchers own connections with the military.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.742033  DOI: Not available
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