Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.741002
Title: The effect of coaching on the transfer and sustainability of learning : coaching for leaders, a collaborative action research study
Author: Cook, Janice
Awarding Body: Oxford Brookes University
Current Institution: Oxford Brookes University
Date of Award: 2011
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
Coaching generally remains under-researched and in particular the transfer and sustainability of learning from coaching is extremely sparse in the field of empirical research and theoretical development. This qualitative research was conducted with four leaders from UK voluntary sector organisations, namely Advance, Mencap and Rethink. Within a social constructivist and interpretivist paradigm, this longitudinal study explored the findings of three action research cycles for a period of just over one year. An original approach to collaborative action research methodology was developed and utilised, combining the dual role of coach/researcher, the role of the leaders being coached as collaborative action researchers, research diaries data, and data from feedback provider sessions. The data emerging from the research diaries and the feedback provider sessions was analysed using a thematic analysis approach, with categories and themes identified which either help or hinder the transfer and sustainability of learning from the coaching sessions to outside that experience. The ethical challenges of this newly developed approach to collaborative action research were also identified and analysed. The emergent Collaborative Action Coaching for Leaders model comprises six categories made up of thirty-three themes: Client Centred Process (eight themes), Enabling/Facilitating Learning (six), Session Content (two), Active Learning (five), Coaching Relationship (eight), and Reflective Learning (four). The study found that the transfer and sustainability of learning outside the coaching experience is encouraged by the coach and the client having both individual and shared responsibilities. The coach has responsibility for tailoring the coaching to each individual client and for enabling and facilitating learning; the client has responsibility for the content of the coaching sessions and for active learning; and both the coach and the client have shared responsibility for the coaching relationship and reflective learning. Within the approach there are factors which both help and hinder the transfer and sustainability of learning, although the data is heavily weighted towards the factors which help. It is clear from the emerging data across the three action research cycles, that it is the combination of all six categories (and the thirty-three themes) which over time enable the transfer and sustainability of learning; there does not appear to be any weighting of a specific category or theme. There are two main findings from the study: coaching can help the transfer and sustainability of learning; and both the coach and the client have individual and shared responsibilities in the transfer and sustainability of learning from the coaching sessions to outside that experience. The Collaborative Action Coaching for Leaders model contributes to the coaching profession, providing an evidence-based coaching model for coaches to explore through use in their professional work with leaders in organisations. The study findings add to the theoretical knowledge of coaching and inform future coaching research into the transfer and sustainability of learning from the coaching experience.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.C.M.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.741002  DOI: Not available
Keywords: coaching ; mentoring
Share: