Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.740491
Title: Understanding the concept of trust within the context of celebrity endorsement and examining its effects on advertising credibility, brand credibility, corporate credibility, and corporate image : a study from the perspectives of consumers in United Kingdom
Author: Hussain, Shahzeb
ISNI:       0000 0004 7226 8380
Awarding Body: Middlesex University
Current Institution: Middlesex University
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This research extended the knowledge on trust within the context of celebrity endorsement by creating a valid and reliable celebrity trust scale. It also examined the effects of celebrity trust on advertising credibility, brand credibility, corporate credibility and corporate image. Trust is defined as a confidence in the trusted party's integrity, competence, benevolence and reliability; it requires faith, mutual emotional investment and a willingness to rely on the trusted party (Morgan and Hunt, 1994; Mayer et al., 1995). It plays a major role in generating relationships between consumers and brands. Because of trust, consumers believe that a specific brand has qualities that make it unique, competent, consistent and honest. In the past few decades, researchers have explored several aspects of trust within the context of brand management, but a thorough analysis of the literature reveals gaps that need to be explored further. One of these gaps was in the area of celebrity endorsement. A similar construct to trust, that of trustworthiness, had already been an area of interest within the context of celebrity endorsement, but the literature revealed that there are vital differences between the two (Cowles, 1997; Soh, 2009). These differences existed in their definitions, operational characteristics, dimensions and components, and clearly make trustworthiness insufficient to define trust in the celebrity endorsement context. Further, it was unclear what effects celebrity trust had on other credibility constructs, i.e. advertising credibility, brand credibility and corporate credibility, and corporate image. It was also unclear what effects celebrity trust had on other credibility constructs and corporate image based on consumer demographics, i.e. age, gender and ethnicity. This research had been carried out to minimise these gaps by fully exploring celebrity trust. The study used a mixed-method research design, predominantly a quantitative approach, assisted by insights from an exploratory phase, which encompassed in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. The first stage of this research involved a thorough literature review, where multi-item measures from studies in social psychology and business studies were gathered. The second stage of the research involved interviews and focus groups with customers and professionals to collect more items and to purify current items. The third and final stage involved quantitative survey to examine the validity and reliability of the multiitem measures obtained (regarding celebrity trust and other constructs) and to examine the relationships between the constructs. A sample of 625 respondents was used to perform multivariate analysis of the data, which included exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling, to ensure that the scales developed were valid and reliable. The findings from the qualitative study revealed that celebrity trust was based on cognitive and/or affective dimension(s). It was found that celebrity trust had positive effects on advertising credibility, brand credibility, corporate credibility, and corporate image, both directly, and through the effects of age and ethnicity. It was also found that advertising credibility had positive effects on brand credibility, corporate credibility, and corporate image; brand credibility had positive effects on corporate credibility and corporate image; and corporate credibility had positive effect on corporate image. The findings from the quantitative study revealed that celebrity trust had positive effects on advertising credibility, brand credibility, and corporate image. The findings also showed that out of age, gender, and ethnicity, ethnicity was the only moderator, which confirmed the effects of celebrity trust on advertising credibility, brand credibility, and corporate image. Further, it was found that advertising credibility had positive effects on brand credibility, corporate credibility, and corporate image; brand credibility had positive effects on corporate credibility and corporate image; and corporate credibility had a positive effect on corporate image. There was little evidence in the literature on the celebrity trust topic. This research had operationalised the concept of trust within the context of celebrity endorsement, and had examined the effects of celebrity trust on other credibility constructs and on corporate image. Further, this study had also examined the effects of celebrity trust on other credibility constructs and on corporate image based on consumer demographics. The results of this study would help advertisers and marketers to understand celebrity trust based on both the affective and cognitive dimensions; to understand the effects of celebrity trust on credibility and corporate image; and to understand the effects of celebrity trust on other credibility constructs and corporate image based on consumer demographics.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.740491  DOI: Not available
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