Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.740390
Title: Aerodynamic interactions of non-planar rotors
Author: Bennetts, Alexander
ISNI:       0000 0004 7226 0696
Awarding Body: University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
The aim of this thesis is to improve understanding of the effects of rotor-rotor interference on small scale rotor systems used on Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs). Previous research on rotor-rotor interactions has focused primarily on planar co-axial and tandem rotors of large scale rotorcraft. The work presented is distinct from prior research not only in its consideration of non-planar rotor systems, but also because of the lower Reynolds numbers and the use of fixed-pitch variable-speed propulsion systems. A design for a novel adjustable rotor interaction test-rig is presented along with a methodology for acquiring accurate and repeatable steady state performance data for two interacting rotor systems. Two six-axis force balances are used to acquire instantaneous and time averaged force and torque data and PIV is used to derive instantaneous and time-averaged flow field data for single and interacting rotor cases. The resulting performance and flow field data represents a unique dataset that can be used in the analysis of small scale rotor interactions, and in the validation of CFD investigations. Results show that for disc angles of between 180 degrees and 90 degrees interactions between rotors are negligible. As the disc angle is reduced from the orthogonal case to the coaxial case interactions significantly effect thrust, pitching moment, and efficiency. It is recommended that in the design of non-planar multirotor vehicles disc angles greater than 75 degrees are utilised to avoid the strong rotor-rotor interactions seen at lower disc angles. A review of existing and future non-planar multirotor concepts shows that the majority avoid significant rotor interactions by virtue of large disc angles.
Supervisor: Crowther, William ; Hollingsworth, Peter Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.740390  DOI: Not available
Keywords: aerodynamics ; Rotor ; Non-planar ; Drone ; UAV ; Multirotor
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