Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.737875
Title: Psychometric evaluation of therapist competency rating scales
Author: Hughes, Lucy
ISNI:       0000 0004 7225 3912
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Literature Review: A systematic review of the psychometric properties and quality of scales measuring therapist competency in delivering psychotherapy to adults was conducted. Thirteen studies met the a priori criteria and were included in the final analysis. The results showed seven therapist competency rating scales had good reliability and validity. All studies tested the interrater reliability of scales, but limited evidence was provided for validity. The psychometric methodology between studies was inconsistent. Most scales were applicable to high-intensity CBT practice, or for specific treatment with drug-dependent patients. Further research is needed to develop psychometrically valid and reliable therapist competency rating scales for a range of theoretical therapeutic approaches and mental health conditions. Research Report The research report provided a psychometric evaluation of the Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner Competency rating Scale for Assessment (PWPCS-A) and Treatment (PWPCS-T). The scales measure practitioner competency in delivering low-intensity CBT treatments for patients with mild to moderate anxiety or depression. Data was utilised from PWPCS-A and PWPCS-T ratings from 176 expert, qualified, and novice psychological wellbeing practitioners (PWPs). Further analysis of reliability, and validity was determined from data collected from 114 PWP trainees’ Observed Structured Clinical Examinations. The PWPCS-A showed excellent reliability and validity, and the PWPCS-T demonstrated acceptable results. The research provides support for the use of the PWP competency scales for PWP training. Limitations, clinical implications, and future research are discussed.
Supervisor: Kellett, Stephen Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.737875  DOI: Not available
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