Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.736715
Title: How do patients who have self-harmed, experience contact with mental health services in a general hospital? : an exploratory study using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis
Author: Walker, Sandra Clare
ISNI:       0000 0004 6500 7094
Awarding Body: University of Southampton
Current Institution: University of Southampton
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The UK national policy on self-harm states that people who have self-harmed should be offered assessment by mental health services during an admission to a general hospital. However there is no empirical evidence underpinning this policy statement and there is a dearth of information regarding the experience of people who self-harm and are assessed in a general hospital. The aim of this research was to explore the lived experience of contact with mental health services for ten people admitted to a general hospital following self-harm. A phenomenological approach utilising Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was adopted to explore this experience. Findings revealed the experience to encompass four superordinate themes which contained lower ordinate themes: (i) internal barriers to getting the help needed; (ii) the business of being human; (iii) traumatising environment; (iv) patient power. The study concluded that the interaction between mental health services and the person who has self-harmed has the potential to be life affirming and transformational but only if it is skilfully conducted and the relationship between practitioner and patient is a positive one. Further implications for both services and individual practitioners are considered alongside recommendations for future practice.
Supervisor: Brown, Joanne ; Bartlett, Ruth Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.736715  DOI: Not available
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