Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.736645
Title: The Gulf Arab States and Egypt's political economy : examining new spaces of food and agribusiness
Author: Henderson, Christian
ISNI:       0000 0004 6500 5945
Awarding Body: SOAS University of London
Current Institution: SOAS, University of London
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This thesis argues that the relationship between the Gulf Arab states and Egypt constitutes a region in the third food regime, as defined by a circuit of commodities and capital. The flow of capital from Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states into Egyptian food and agriculture since 1988 has played a central role in the construction of a corporate food system. This thesis will outline this process in three stages of the supply chain: horticulture on reclaimed land, agro-industrial production and supermarkets and retail. This space is also defined by the export of horticultural products such as table crops and livestock feed from Egypt to the Gulf states. The development of this region has been predicated on the formation of close links between Gulf investors and the Egyptian state. This state-capital nexus allowed Gulf capital to territorialise through the mediation of access to state resources by the Egyptian government. This nexus is a synthesis of relations that includes the Egyptian military and Egyptian capitalists who also have close ties to the state. This thesis will posit financial markets and institutions as main vehicles for the internationalisation of Gulf capital into Egypt as they created joint-shareholdings and partnerships that form the state-capital nexus. The Gulf-Egypt region has led to the formation of new spaces of production at the national scale in Egypt. Companies with GCC shareholders have invested in land reclamation schemes and agro-industrial projects that have allowed a heightened level of control over production and the environment. This spatial reorganisation illustrates the scalar nature of this region and the extraction of value through these new spaces.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.736645  DOI:
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