Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.736005
Title: Risk factors for psychological insult following deployment to Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom among veterans : a systematic review ; A cross-sectional study investigating the impact of disease activity and disease related cognitions on adjustment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Author: Seaman, Angela
ISNI:       0000 0004 6500 8839
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Risk factors for psychological insult following deployment to Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom among veterans: A systematic review: The systematic review aimed to establish more clearly the risk factors for mental health problems in the veteran population. Five databases were searched. Included studies (n = 10) required that veterans served in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and/or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and included risk factors of mental health problems among the veteran population. Data from included studies were extracted and critically appraised based on critical appraisal tools following a narrative approach to synthesise data. All of the studies reviewed identified risk factors, although due to their heterogeneous nature key findings varied considerably. However, it was consistently reported that combat exposure and deployment experiences were associated with emergence of post operational mental health problems. The current review provides preliminary evidence that there are a number of specific risk factors that may increase susceptibility to mental health problems subsequent to military deployment. It is suggested that interventions are needed in order to mitigate risk factors and bolster protective factors. A cross-sectional study investigating the impact of disease activity and disease related cognitions on adjustment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The research journal aimed to investigate the degree to which psychological illness related cognitions will mediate the effect of disease activity on Quality of Life (QoL). In addition, to assess the impact of disease activity, and several psychological factors, in several adjustments outcomes in IBD to see whether the adjustment variables are significant predictors of multiple outcomes. Mediation was used followed by an exploratory cross-sectional correlational design. Three hundred and thirty eight participants were recruited through an IBD charity and invited to respond to a self-report questionnaire online. Measures targeted different aspects of the IBD profile to give an indication of adjustment associated with IBD diagnosis, psychological factors and Quality of Life (QoL). Mediation analysis found support for significant indirect effects on the relationship between disease activity and QoL through Gastrointestinal (GI) anxiety, perceived disability and illness representations. The subsidiary analysis indicated that pain catastrophising, disease activity, stigma, illness representations and GI anxiety were found to be significant predictors of adjustment in IBD. The results indicate that there is an important relationship with the adjustment factors, QoL, and psychological functioning. In addition, stress, depression, anxiety and QoL were found to be predicted by the adjustment factors. The current study has provided insight into psychological factors and adjustment indicators from a multi-faceted perspective, which will facilitate advancement of managing IBD from a biopsychosocial framework with a view to enable more effective disease management.
Supervisor: Ferreira, Nuno ; Downey, Bruce Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.736005  DOI: Not available
Keywords: mental health problems ; risk factors ; veteran population ; quality of life ; psychological illness ; inflammatory bowel disease ; psychological factors ; adjustment indicators ; disease management
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