Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.735378
Title: History and the Nation in the work of Fionn MacColla
Author: Simoni, Anna Laura
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2003
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Abstract:
It is the object of this thesis to undertake a revisionary analysis of the work of Scottish author, historiographer and pioneering nationalist, Fionn MacColla. Generally, MacColla has been regarded as an excessively radical figure whose allegedly dogmatic approach has too often obscured the more promising aspects of his work. He continues to feature in the most up-to-date accounts of twentieth-century Scottish literature as the voice of an unpalatable extremism which, with religion at its core, is too controversial, too sensitive and too antagonistic to be considered constructive. This thesis argues, however, that MacColla has been typecast as a Catholic propagandist and erroneously categorised under the assumption that his motives were purely religious or his views extreme. It shows that such a view not only overlooks the complexity and significance of his often esoteric, though not impenetrable, ideas, but grossly oversimplifies and misrepresents them. The thesis focuses, particularly, on MacColla's theoretical approach to history while exploring the techniques which he develops in his attempt to construct a narrative method capable of re-presenting the issues raised in his theoretical material. Importantly, it does not attempt to situate MacColla within a specific context, other than that of his role within the twentieth-century Scottish Renaissance Movement. It is the aim of this thesis, rather, to identify and explore the conceptual content of MacColla's theory and fiction as part of a need to consolidate a greater understanding of a writer who, at best, has only been dealt with fleetingly within the Scottish critical canon.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.735378  DOI: Not available
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