Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.735365
Title: Do schemas mediate the relationship between parental bonding and psychopathology in adulthood?
Author: Murray, Lindsey K.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2003
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Abstract:
The significant influence of early experiences on vulnerability to psychopathology has been proposed in several prominent theories of emotional disorders. One aspect of early experience that has been investigated rigorously with respect to development of psychological difficulties is the nature of parental bonding. Associations between two dimensions of parental bonding - care and overprotection - and psychopathology have been repeatedly documented, with low levels of care and high levels of overprotection more apparent in individuals experiencing psychological distress. However, research investigating the possible mechanisms by which aspects of an individual's parental bonding experience might result in development of psychopathology is lacking. Given the emphasis on cognitive factors in a number of influential theories of psychopathology, it seems feasible that dysfunctional beliefs might mediate this relationship. Although a few studies have primarily supported this hypothesis, such studies have been conducted using specific populations and without reference to anxiety symptomatology, which is commonly manifested in a large number of individuals seeking psychological input. Therefore, the current study primarily aimed to examine whether dysfunctional schemas mediated the relationship between parental bonding and both anxiety and depressive symptomatology, using a self-report questionnaire methodology across a sample of general psychiatric outpatients and a comparison group. Such a model was supported for depressive symptomatology, but only partially supported with respect to anxiety symptomatology. Although limitations of the study methodology suggest that conclusions must be tentative, greater focus on schemas in therapy seems indicated.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.735365  DOI: Not available
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