Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.733279
Title: Dynamic light structures : the aesthetic and performative qualities of solid light scenography for performance and installation
Author: Hurst, Andrew
ISNI:       0000 0004 6497 2511
Awarding Body: University of Kent
Current Institution: University of Kent
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This practice as research thesis centres on the use of light projected through theatrical haze as a method of creating tangible, volumetric objects within a performance or installation space. The practice seeks to define light as a physical object, not simply an illuminating force but as a material in its own right, and in doing so examines the relationships built between that physically perceived light and the performer, the installation participant, the audience and the choreographer. The term Dynamic Light Structure has been coined here as a way to identify light perceived as a solid object, and to describe a sense of movement, reconfiguration and agency. Although the use of theatrical haze for performance lighting design is an accepted and ubiquitous technique used in the pursuit of conditioning a stage space, the resultant volumetric forms that appear when light is introduced to that conditioned space have not been examined in terms other than those relating to design methodology. This thesis moves beyond discourse that explores light as a design tool by placing the Dynamic Light Structure at the heart of the performance and installation experience. The research establishes the relationships that are built between Dynamic Light Structures and audience members, installation visitors and choreographers. In examining participant reception and practitioner process, the research defines how Dynamic Light Structures are perceived as autonomous stage objects in dialogue with a live performer, as manipulable objects used to redefine an environment and as process tools that can shape the trajectory of performance making.
Supervisor: Trimingham, Melissa ; Klich, Rosemary Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.733279  DOI: Not available
Keywords: N Fine Arts
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