Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.732970
Title: The Aimara identity of Neopentecostals in urban La Paz, Bolivia : with specific reference to the Power of God Church
Author: Vargas, Marcelo
Awarding Body: Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Current Institution: Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
There is a verify combination of religious identity between popular Catholicism and Aimara beliefs in La Paz, Bolivia after five centuries of dealings. It may be a similar case among Neopentecostals and Aimaras after four decades of intersection. This thesis presents a study about the vigorous contemporaneous intercultural exchange between the Aimara indigenous identity in urban La Paz and Neopentecostalism. In the Bolivian context the Aimara ethnicity, with its distinctive way of perceiving the world and living in it, wields a permanent weight inculcating a sense of personal and collective identity and continuity. This study aims to explain, analyse, and evaluate the forces that shape the identity of the Bolivian Neopentecostals, with particular regard to ‘Power of God’, the most important Neopentecostal Aimara church in the most indigenous Latin American country, Bolivia. Furthermore the study seeks to find an understanding of how Neopentecostal churches are shifting the identity of the urban Aimara by combining the indigenous beliefs with imported ones. It seems that they are joining old and new religious elements resting on the foundation of a pre-existing worldview. Open observations of indigenous culture such as multidimensional logic, beliefs, language, values, costumes, and institutions. A description and enquiry of Neopentecostal Aimaras both from a historical perspective and as part of socio-religious phenomenology heading towards to the issue of religious cultural identity. Field research was the main approach adopted for the study, applying participant analytical observation, focus groups and in-depth interviews that allowed members of the church to relate people’s ongoing Neopentecostal faith to their establish primal identity. Literature research prioritized Aimara, Bolivian and Latin American resident authors.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.732970  DOI: Not available
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