Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.732968
Title: A critical study of the oracles against the Transjordanian kingdoms
Author: Sodadasi, David Anand Raj
Awarding Body: Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Current Institution: Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to investigate the significance of the oracles against the Transjordanian kingdoms of Ammon, Moab and Edom in the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel from a conflict theory perspective. The thesis shows that Israel and Judah (Cisjordan) and Transjordan were tribes, despite claims to have been nations. Their relationships often ended in conflicts producing war, looting, land grabbing and disputes over borders and territories. These conflicts arose because of the material and political imbalances of the region. The Hebrew prophets interpreted the regional tensions in terms of morality, blaming their neighbouring kingdoms for their pride and arrogance. The thesis also reveals that there were internal conflicts within the Transjordanian kingdoms due to famines and tribal divisions in towns such as Heshbon, which took sides with Ammon or Moab according to their socio-political strengths in different periods. Such internal conflicts helped external imperial powers to exploit them and invade the Transjordanian kingdoms. The theory of LaBianca and Younker on the tribal nature of Transjordan further helped the understanding of how the conflicts occurred in the tribal societies of the Transjordanian region. The oracles against the Transjordanian kingdoms were written from the Hebrew point of view. The thesis explains about the material world of Transjordan, its tribal nature and the conflicts that affected the region, including the neighbouring kingdoms of Judah and Israel. It further reveales how Yahweh was active in using his agents in the major conflicts that occurred through the imperial powers and the neighbouring kingdoms.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.732968  DOI: Not available
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