Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.732943
Title: The emergence of Christ Groups in India : the case of Karnataka state
Author: Borgall, Sahebjan
Awarding Body: Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Current Institution: Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
The thesis studies the effect of the western individualistic approach to Christian evangelism in the Indian relational context, especially the emergence of Christ Groups. These grew as the conversion of families began in reaction to the house to house tract distribution which aimed to win individuals. The process was done by the nationals who shared their experiences without threatening the culture. The relational context of India shaped how the Christ Groups received and shared the gospel. The organisational culture of the Christian agency, World Literature Crusade was transmitted and internalised by its Indian staff, and imposed its aims and objectives on the recipients. But Christ Groups survived under pressure because of the peoples’ involvement and willingness to own the vision. An open-ended interview was conducted for 200 members of four Christ Groups, a questionnaire was administered, and a case study was made on the Hosadurga Christ Group. A questionnaire was given to WLC and IEHC officials to assess their interest in Christ Groups. The responses are statistically analysed by qualitative and quantitative methods. The evaluation concentrates on the response of the context, and the perception and role of the members about themselves and Christ Groups. The study locates Christ Groups in relation to other missionary approaches and finds their unique approach of evangelism that allows the cultural response to develop at its own pace contrasts with the approach of mass movements, of church growth through homogenous units, of inclusiveness, of complete social and cultural change and of focus on social responsibility, and of social justice. None of the approaches seemed mutually contradictory, but together fill the gaps and widens the concept of evangelism in context.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.732943  DOI: Not available
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