Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.731449
Title: Novel tools for the capture of intermediates of iterative polyketide catalysis
Author: Kilgour, Samantha L.
ISNI:       0000 0004 6496 7915
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Polyketide natural products are a major source of pharmaceutical and agricultural compounds. Their biosynthesis is highly complex and the elucidation of intermediate steps is highly desirable to the scientific community for microorganism engineering purposes. In this work, novel photoactivatable ‘chain termination’ probes were prepared as tools for the off-loading and capture of biosynthetic intermediates from polyketide synthases (PKSs); novel methods to analyse polyketide biosynthetic intermediates via FTICR-MS were also investigated. The chemical probes herein reported are nonhydrolysable analogues of ACP-bound malonate used in polyketide biosynthesis for carbon chain elongation. This research focused on the preparation of a chemoenzymatically modified acyl carrier protein that, upon activation via UV irradiation, should compete with discrete ‘natural’ acyl carrier proteins to capture biosynthetic intermediates from challenging type II polyketide iterative assemblies. Promising preliminary results for the use of this tool in vitro were obtained in the form of putative actinorhodin ACP-bound intermediates observed and characterised by FTICR-MS. Moreover, a 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl group was also prepared and successfully employed for trapping biosynthetic intermediates from the in vivo assembly of the antibiotic lasalocid A. Lastly, mass spectrometric methods involving alkali metal adduct ions were explored in order to improve the characterisation of free and enzyme-bound biosynthetic intermediates. Overall this work contributes further to our current and future understanding of polyketide synthases and related systems.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.731449  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QD Chemistry
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