Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.729457
Title: Defining Orphism : the beliefs, the teletae and the writings
Author: Chrysanthou, Anthi
Awarding Body: University of Leeds
Current Institution: University of Leeds
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
My research aims to define the Orphic beliefs and mysteries through the examination and analysis of the Orphic writings and evidence. I will be dealing with four main components which are: the Derveni Papyrus, the Orphic Rhapsodies, the Gold Tablets and the Olbian Bone Tablets. Apart from discussing these components individually, I will also inter-relate them through a narrative, conceptual and semiotic approach and comparison. Scholarship up to now has examined the aforementioned components individually, which did not allow for a substantial in depth comparison to take place. This is partly due to the fact that the Orphic Rhapsodies survive through innumerable fragments which do not offer a coherent picture of their contents. Part of my thesis, therefore, deals with this matter through attempting to reconstruct the surviving text of the Orphic Rhapsodies. Apart from these main components, I will also discuss numerous primary literary and archaeological sources referring directly or indirectly to Orphism, Orphics or Orpheus, and covering a chronological period from the 8th century B.C. up to Late Antique. This is essential in order to place Orphism in a historical and sociological context, and to enhance our observations considering the ancient attitudes towards Orphism. Through this all-encompassing approach to one of the most intriguing matters in the field of Classics, I hope to offer some useful insights as to how Orphism can be defined and gain a better understanding of the Orphic practices, texts and beliefs.
Supervisor: Heath, Malcolm ; Stafford, Emma Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.729457  DOI: Not available
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