Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.725656
Title: Investigating the perspectives of foster carers and their birth children
Author: Adams, Emma
ISNI:       0000 0004 6424 7256
Awarding Body: Canterbury Christ Church University
Current Institution: Canterbury Christ Church University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Background: Research has demonstrated that there is more likely to be a disruption to the placement where foster carers have birth children. Given the limited presence of the birth children of foster carers in research and the importance of the retention of carers, it seems relevant to policy and practice to investigate the parent-child relationship. Therefore, this study aimed to explore how the birth children of foster carers experienced their relationship with their parents. Method: Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse semi-structured interviews with eight young people who were the birth children of foster carers. Results: Three superordinate themes emerged. These were: ‘relational processes that give value to my role in the family’, ‘threats to our relationship’ and ‘making sense as a way of managing the threats’. Each of these superordinate themes contained subthemes. Conclusions: The findings suggest that the processes of ‘making sense’ and ‘feeling valued’ serve to buffer the impact of potential threats to the parent-child relationship. Clinical implications include the application of a model that has been developed to elucidate the relationship between the themes. This has clinical implications for further understanding and informing the way services support both foster carers and their children.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.725656  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF0636 Applied psychology
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