Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.724812
Title: Should we always look on the bright side of life? : the role of protective factors in forensic risk assessment and management
Author: Jansen, Krista
ISNI:       0000 0004 6420 9735
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This thesis will aim to identify the role of protective factors in clinical risk prediction and management of inpatients in secure services. Chapter one provides an introduction to the field of forensic risk assessment, and a justification for the importance of including protective factors to create a more balanced assessment of patient risk. Chapter two presents a systematic review exploring the role of protective factors in various risk assessment tools. The aims of this review is to identify risk assessment tools that incorporate a measure of protective strengths, and the predictive validity of these tools for the outcome of inpatient aggression or violence. Chapter three provides a critical review of the START, specifically focused on its strengths and weaknesses as a risk prediction tool, demonstrating good validity, reliability, in addition to excellent inter-rater reliability. Findings will be reported in terms of the clinical utility of this tool. Chapter four presents the findings from a research project that aimed to identify the predictive validity of the START in female forensic inpatients, highlighting the efficacy of the specific risk estimates. Chapter five utilises a case study to identify how promoting protective factors in the form of coping skills can reduce self-harming behaviours. This case study aims to demonstrate that focusing treatment on promoting patient strengths can be effective in reducing adverse outcomes. Finally, chapter six discusses the overall findings and clinical implications from the present thesis. Future research directions will also be discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Foren.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.724812  DOI: Not available
Keywords: WM Psychiatry
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