Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.723603
Title: Beginning teachers' experiences of preparation & additional well-being support throughout initial teacher education
Author: Cook, Laura
ISNI:       0000 0004 6425 6638
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2017
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
Beginning Teacher (BT) attrition in the UK has been described as problematically high (Hughes, 2012). Whilst many contributing factors towards teacher attrition have been identified (Schaefer (2013), Foreman-Peck (2015)) suggests that the role of well-being, and the contextual-level issues that influence it, are frequently overlooked. Given that many of the same reasons are cited by BTs for both negative well-being and premature attrition (Harfitt, 2015), Hamilton and Clandinin (2011) identify research into BT well-being as a worthwhile area of study. This study adopted a pragmatist, mixed-methods approach in exploring BTs’ experiences of preparation and additional well-being support throughout Initial Teacher Education (ITE) in Wales at two time-points: end of ITE (Time 1) and approximately eight weeks into teaching (Time 2). At Time 1, online- questionnaires, containing both quantitative and qualitative questions, captured the experiences of 109 BTs. Six BTs also participated in semi-structured interviews. At Time 2, 34 BTs from the original questionnaire-cohort completed a follow-up questionnaire, whilst five of the original interviewees participated in a follow-up interview. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was conducted (Smith, Flowers & Larkin, 2009). The IPA-process utilised by Snelgrove, Edwards and Liossi (2013) was also adopted as a guide for analysing interview data from two time-points. Findings outlined a need for more in-depth preparation during ITE; particularly in relation to some of the aspects of teaching that can have a detrimental impact on well- being. Also found was the need for more direct well-being support for BTs, focusing first on reducing the stigma associated with teacher well-being and increasing communication between ITE staff, placement-school staff and BTs. Recommendations for developments within ITE to support BTs’ well-being from the outset of their careers are made, with consideration as to how educational psychologists might contribute.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Ed.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.723603  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
Share: